Media Archive

Browse through our media library to see previous lectures, presentations, initiative intros and other videos from the Novo Nordisk Foundation Science Cluster.

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Lecture: CO2 as a resource

Mitigating climate change will require decarbonisation of many sectors, including the energy sector, but does also necessitate chemicals and materials currently produced from fossil resources to be produced from renewable resources. With recent advancements in CO2 capture technologies, it will be possible to reduce overall CO2 emissions by underground storage. However, combined with disruptive developments within CO2 conversion technologies will unlock a completely new form of circular bioeconomy where captured CO2 can be utilise as a novel source of carbon to produce materials, chemicals and even food. The lecture will present the research taking place at two NNF Centers within CO2 capture and conversion based on chemical and biological processes.

Lecture: CO2 as a resource
Lecture: CO2 as a resource

Lecture: Quantum Computers & Simulators

Many research and industry applications are currently contemplating how to achieve an advantage from using quantum computers and quantum simulators. Through exploitation and control of quantum systems, quantum computing has the potential to solve complex problems exponentially faster, and with significantly less energy consumption, than with classical computing. The main premise is the expectation of a more accurate simulation of the chemical and physical processes of quantum nature in biological objects and new algorithms for prediction and processing of data. This is of specific interest for biological systems, where accurate modelling of quantum phenomena in a complex environment is necessary for an adequate representation, for example, of enzymatic catalytic reactions, light harvesting, and molecular dynamics, for instance protein folding or binding of a drug. Other proposed applications range from genomics classification and optimisation, materials science, logistics and optimization, encryption and information security, and artificial intelligence. The lectures will give an overview of the significant progress that has been made with the development of quantum simulators as well as noisy intermediate-scale quantum (NISQ) computers. It will also be discussed what problems a more generally applicable fault-tolerant quantum computer could help solving, which is the main mission of the recently announced NNF Quantum Computing

Lecture: Quantum Computers & Simulators
Lecture: Quantum Computers & Simulators

Lecture: The Changing Global Disease Burden

The pattern and burden of disease is changing across all regions of the world. Understanding the drivers of this epidemiological transition is essential in informing preventive strategies, the investments in health systems and in establishing the most relevant research agenda for the future. The shifting demographics, increasing urbanization, socio-economic developments, medical advancements and environmental change are among the key drivers of the epidemiological transition. Most low and middle-income countries are experiencing a rapid increase in non-communicable diseases but at the same time have to cope with a significant burden of infectious diseases. Developing policies and interventions addressing this double burden of disease represents a huge potential for impact and an opportunity to improve the lives for the majority of the population on the planet.

Lecture: The Changing Global Disease Burden
Lecture: The Changing Global Disease Burden

Lecture: Energy Management for Metabolic Homeostasis

Energy Management for Metabolic Homeostasis: Key roles for metabolic master switch AMPK and the NAD+ biosynthesis system Energy sensing systems are present in all cells of our body. They are important for transducing information on the energetic status of the cell to downstream effector pathways to ensure appropriate adaptation in response to metabolic stress. These energy sensing systems are intricately regulated by various signaling molecules in the form of nutrients and nucleotides. Professor Kei Sakamoto and Associate Professor Jonas T. Treebak will present their work on understanding the roles of the AMP-activated protein kinase and the NAD+ biosynthesis system for management of cellular metabolic homeostasis, and how this may have implications for overall metabolic health of organisms, including humans.

Lecture: Energy Management for Metabolic Homeostasis
Lecture: Energy Management for Metabolic Homeostasis

Lecture: The Future of Plant Protection

Protecting our crops from insects and diseases is paramount, if we are to feed the still increasing population of the world, while at the same time saving land for nature and biodiversity to flourish. The pesticides we have used as main tools for crop protection for the past 70 years have many unwanted side-effects for both human and environmental health. We therefore need to use less pesticides, and think crop protection in new ways that jointly have less adverse effects on human and environmental health. Some of the new tools to be used in crop protection have a higher degree of biological foundation, ranging from phages, bacteria or fungal microorganisms protecting plants from diseases or attacking arthropod pests, to more targeted proteins, peptides or double stranded RNAs that interfere specifically with biochemical pathways of specific arthropod pests or diseases. In this talk, Nina will focus on the targeted biological molecules: proteins, peptides and double stranded RNAs and how they work. Which opportunities and challenges that lie ahead developing such approaches, and what the main barriers are for implementation.

Lecture: The Future of Plant Protection
Lecture: The Future of Plant Protection

Lecture: Epidemic Preparedness

How has the COVID-19 pandemic revolutionized vaccine science? The COVID-19 pandemic has placed vaccine science in the limelight and acutely demonstrated how vaccines can save lives and societies. The rapid advances in vaccine science spurred by the COVID-19 pandemic were built on a solid foundation of infectious disease research and provide promise for better ways of fighting new and existing infectious diseases.

Lecture: Epidemic Preparedness
Lecture: Epidemic Preparedness

Lecture: Open Innovation in Science

Can openness counter the decreasing efficiency of the life science innovation system? Join us when Niclas Nilsson and Marie Louise Conradsen discuss the challenges of the current model for translating academic research into innovation – and why an open approach to IPR and university-industry collaboration might be the way forward.

Lecture: Open Innovation in Science
Lecture: Open Innovation in Science

Lecture: Healthy Weight Initiative

Healthy Weight Initiative: Strategic Efforts to Promote a Healthy Weight among Danish Children

Lecture: Healthy Weight Initiative
Lecture: Healthy Weight Initiative

Copenhagen Bioscience PhD Programme: Hanna Sedlackova

Copenhagen Bioscience PhD Programme: Hanna Sedlackova
Copenhagen Bioscience PhD Programme: Hanna Sedlackova

Copenhagen Bioscience PhD Programme: Gonzalo Tueros

Copenhagen Bioscience PhD Programme: Gonzalo Tueros
Copenhagen Bioscience PhD Programme: Gonzalo Tueros

Lecture: Defining Disease with Big Data

Disease have historically been defined from their clinical presentation including symptoms and objective findings. Along with the ongoing biotechnical revolution and its inherent possibilities to characterize individual people at the most basal cellular and molecular level with respect to their entire genome, transcriptome, proteome, epigenome, microbiome, metabolome, lipidome etc., our insights into distinct disease etiologies as well as category defining and predictive biomarkers is rapidly increasing. This combined with larger, more detailed, prospective and more reliable patient registries has opened up for unique opportunities to understand the heterogeneity of current disease classifications, and subsequently to re- and subclassify diseases in new and more clinical useful and logical ways according to distinct etiology, treatment needs and prognosis etc.

Lecture: Defining Disease with Big Data
Lecture: Defining Disease with Big Data

Lecture: The Next Biology Revolution

The development of Quantum computers might pose a quantum leap forward in the truest sense of the wording. A technology with the potential to change the aptitude of bioscience entirely, EU has denoted it “a key sector of technological development in the 21st century”, and companies and states race to take the lead in the progress towards its development and application. So what is Quantum Computing?

Lecture: The Next Biology Revolution
Lecture: The Next Biology Revolution

Lecture: Alleviating Poverty

Online lecture. The global increase of protracted crises and displacement challenge social and economic empowerment, both for displaced and host populations. Adopting new approaches, with the potential to advance the humanitarian-development nexus, is called for. Developed in Bangladesh, the Graduation Approach is receiving increased attention as a method that effectively fosters long-term inclusion and self-reliance. Can this model be translated to meet the challenges in Jordan, host to a large number of Syrian refugees and confronted with a high poverty rate?

Lecture: Alleviating Poverty
Lecture: Alleviating Poverty

Lecture: The AMR Challenge

Scientific, Economic, and Clinical Perspectives on Antimicrobial Resistance. The prevalence of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is increasing world-wide and faster in some areas than others. The main concern is the failure to treat serious infections with antibiotics, the more resistance the fewer available drugs. The consequence is increasing mortality, infectious complications, duration of hospital stay and associated costs to society. Multi-resistant organism demand isolation of affected patients in hospitals, which has serious psychological and physical consequences for each patient. AMR drives the use of still more broad-spectrum antibiotics, which again drives selection of more resistance, a vicious circle which we need to acknowledge in our efforts to curb the menace. Mining soils for drugs – Microbes as source for novel antibiotics: The discovery and development of novel antibiotics is an important pillar to fight Antimicrobial Resistance. Famous – and widely used – antibiotics, such as tetracycline, erythromycin or vancomycin, are all originating from soil bacteria and are produced in large scale by fermentation. In this lecture, Tilmann will give examples of Omics- and CRISPR-based approaches to identify, study and produce new bacterial bioactive compounds with potential to be future antibiotic drugs and how these approaches can also help us to understand the origin of several genes leading to antimicrobial resistance in clinical pathogens.

Lecture: The AMR Challenge
Lecture: The AMR Challenge

Copenhagen Bioscience PhD Programme 2021

https://cphbiosciencephd.org/

Copenhagen Bioscience PhD Programme 2021
Copenhagen Bioscience PhD Programme 2021

Lecture: Enzymes at Work

This month, we have the honor of presenting Guillermo Montoya and Jakob Nilsson from the Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Protein Research who will present their findings and provide insight in to different approaches to determining basic principles in proteins.

Lecture: Enzymes at Work
Lecture: Enzymes at Work

Lecture: Biology Beyond Earth

For this lecture, we had the honor of presenting a collaboration project between Chemistry, Astrophysics and Biology, with the aim of setting new frontiers in understanding the limits for the existence of life. The project has received the Novo Nordisk Foundation synergy grant and in this lecture, two of the grantholders will talk about how they initiated the project and give their view on some of the central questions: Are there life on planets orbiting other stars? How much? And which kind?

Lecture: Biology Beyond Earth
Lecture: Biology Beyond Earth

Lecture: World Diabetes Foundation

Live from Novo Nordisk Foundation at 10 September 2020.

Lecture: World Diabetes Foundation
Lecture: World Diabetes Foundation

Lecture: Microbial Communities

Live from Tuborg Havnevej 19, 2900 Hellerup in Denmark on 25 June 2020. Note that there is a problem with the audio until 00:04:30. KEYNOTE SPEAKERS Per Halkjær Nielsen, Head of Center for Microbial Communities at Aalborg University – Revealing structure and function of Microbial Dark Mater in global wastewater treatment and resource recovery systems Mads Albertsen, Professor, Department of Chemistry and Bioscience, Aalborg University – The next frontier of DNA analysis of microbial communities

Lecture: Microbial Communities
Lecture: Microbial Communities

Introduction to the Novo Nordisk Foundation Science Cluster

Introduction to the Novo Nordisk Foundation Science Cluster
Introduction to the Novo Nordisk Foundation Science Cluster

Novo Nordisk Foundation Science Cluster Lectures

The Novo Nordisk Foundation Science Cluster Lectures is a series of open lectures for all researchers and other interested in and around the Copenhagen area. Every 4 weeks, on Thursday evenings, you are invited for lectures on themes with a general interest for the Novo Nordisk Foundation Research Centers and bioscience researchers in general. Often there will be a cross-disciplinary focus.

Novo Nordisk Foundation Science Cluster Lectures
Novo Nordisk Foundation Science Cluster Lectures

What is it like to live and work in Denmark?

Copenhagen Bioscience PhD Programme

What is it like to live and work in Denmark?
What is it like to live and work in Denmark?

How is the academic level of the Copenhagen Bioscience PhD Programme?

Copenhagen Bioscience PhD Programme

How is the academic level of the Copenhagen Bioscience PhD Programme?
How is the academic level of the Copenhagen Bioscience PhD Programme?

What makes the Copenhagen Bioscience PhD Programme different?

What makes the Copenhagen Bioscience PhD Programme different?
What makes the Copenhagen Bioscience PhD Programme different?

How is life as an international PhD student in Denmark?

How is life as an international PhD student in Denmark?
How is life as an international PhD student in Denmark?